INTRODUCTORY CHAPTERS ON DOCTRINAL DEVELOPMENT.

CHAPTER I.

GENERAL NOTIONS.

ACCRETIVE OR OBJECTIVE, AND NON-ACCRETIVE OR SUBJECTIVE DEVELOPMENT. REVEALED TRUTHS OF THE SUBSTANCE OF FAITH, AND ACCESSORY TO ITS SUBSTANCE. EXPLICIT AND IMPLICIT FAITH.

THEOLOGIANS distinguish two kinds of doctrinal development *: the first, development simply so called (simpliciter dictum); the other, development in a qualified or relative sense (secundum quid). The first would have place, should a revelation be made of some truth that had not been before revealed, and consequently could not be believed except by means of this new revelation. The second would be, if some truth that had been before revealed, were, without any fresh revelation, more fully and distinctly explained and more clearly understood, so that what, from its having been previously revealed, was already of Divine faith quoad se, that is, regarded objectively in itself, should now come to be explicitly of faith quoad nos, that is to say, subjectively for us.+. The first kind of development we may call accretive, or objective; the second, non-accretive, or subjective.

In the matter of Divine revelation we must, moreover, distinguish between those revealed truths which are said to belong to the substance of faith, and such as are termed accessory to, or connected with, its substance.


* "From defect of our language the word development is used both for the process of development and for the result." -- Newman's Development, p. 41.

+ Mazzella, De Virtutibus Infusis, p. 284.

 

 

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